Polar bear population falls 40% in 10 years

The number of polar bears inhabiting a frozen sea north of Alaska declined by about 40% from 2001 to 2010, according to a study published on Monday. US Geological Survey researchers and scientists from Canada and the United States found that bear survival rates in the south Beaufort Sea were particularly low from 2004 to 2006, when only two of 80 cubs monitored were known to have survived more…

Source: The Guardian

17/11/14

Love Is Wild [2015]

Right now, there’s a world war against wildlife taking place. More specifically, the large animals in Africa are being targeted for their body parts. 100,000 african elephants were slaughtered between 2010 and 2013 for their ivory tusks. Most of this ivory is illegally sold in Asia as ornaments, bangles and statuettes. Most people aren’t aware that when you buy ivory, that ivory is coming from a dead elephant. Rhino’s are facing a similar plight. 1004 African rhinos were illegally poached in South Africa alone for their horns in 2013 which can fetch up to $70,000USD on the black market. To give you an idea about how the trade has grown exponentially, that’s up from just 13 killed rhinos in 2007 according to the country’s environment ministry. Rhino horn is coveted for it’s fabled ‘medicinal qualities’ and is falsely claimed to be a remedy for everything from fevers to cancer in countries such as Vietnam. Needless to say, rhino horn has no scientific medicinal qualities whatsoever and there is no known benefit to man. And yet the killing is so rampant that, on av¬erage, a wild rhino is getting killed every five hours in Africa. At the current rate of killing, it is estimated that black rhino will go extinct in 15 years.

 

 

We in Asia must take the lion share of the responsibility, as most of the demand originates here. And elephants and rhinos are just the tip of the iceberg. Animals all of shapes and sizes, even the tiny pangolin, are being targeted in a trade now only second in size to the illicit narcotics trade (some estimates value the endangered wildlife trade to be worth USD 29 billion). Even lions are dwindling in numbers due to hunting and habitat encroachment. Some reports say that just 20,000 remain in the wild.

Save-the-Date-v1.5

Only 6 northern white rhinos left on Earth

It’s very sad that to see that there are only 6 northern white rhino left in the world now. Over the last week, rangers found one of the last northern white rhino lifeless in his hut on a Kenyan wildlife conservancy and a short countdown to extinction began.

Suni was one of only seven northern whites left in the world, all of which live in captivity. There are none known to be left in the wild. More importantly, Suni was one of only two breeding males left, said the Ol Pejeta Conservancy in a statement. more…

Source: CNN

21/10/14

We successfully reached the top of Mount Kilimanjaro

The Project C:CHANGE charity climb team successfully reached to the top of Mount Kilimanjaro,at 19,340 ft above sea level, on 18th Feb, 2010.

The team started the 8-hour summit climb at midnight on the 18th Feb from Barafu Base Camp in total darkness.

By the time they reached Stella Point at 6.30am, the weather had severely deteriorated and the team was caught in a snow-storm. Visibility was cut down to 15 feet and the temperature dropped to minus 14 degrees Celsius.

Despite a few minor injuries and some of the team members experiencing mild altitude sickness, all 6 members reached the summit. It was an incredible effort from everyone!
Project C:CHANGE would like to thank everyone for their support, including our sponsors for their participation in this charity climb.

Please carry on supporting us by donating to WWF Hong Kong or Oxfam Hong Kong. We have until March 31st to collect all our pledges.

We will be posting a trip diary and more photos on this website in the next few days.

Thanks again for your support!

The Project C:CHANGE team

Day 4: Barangu Camp

After an incredible 4 days of camping, walking, singing, and a little bit of pain, we reached Barangu camp with Uhuru Peak in the background. We haven’t had reception until up to now so we apologise for not being able to send updates.

The team is in good spirits despite a few minor setbacks. We lost 4 bags at the airport which were recovered and sent up on Day 2. Anthony had some tummy trouble in the first few days, Jocelyn experienced mild altitude sickness on Day 3 but both have recovered. Janice has severe sun burn on her lips and they have swelled. Sean hurt his right knee yesterday and had to have someone else carry his bag. It’s also difficult sleeping because of the high altitude and cold. But the truly mind-blowing landscapes and great camaraderie have kept us going.

During our climb up here we have seen with our own eyes the effects of global warming. The glaciers are surprisingly small and a fraction of what they used to be ten years ago. New river beds have been created in the last few years due to the sheer amount of glacial melt. Our guide Theophil believes the glaciers will disappear within 5 years. It will be a sad day when it happens.

We summit in two days time so we will have a better look at the glaciers then. We hope we can keep you updated along the way.

Kung Hei Fat Choy from the Project C:CHANGE team!

Day 1: Update

After an incredible 4 days of camping, walking, singing, and a little bit of pain, we reached Barangu camp with Uhuru Peak in the background. We haven’t had reception until up to now so we apologise for not being able to send updates.

The team is in good spirits despite a few minor setbacks. We lost 4 bags at the airport which were recovered and sent up on Day 2. Anthony had some tummy trouble in the first few days, Jocelyn experienced mild altitude sickness on Day 3 but both have recovered. Janice has severe sun burn on her lips and they have swelled. Sean hurt his right knee yesterday and had to have someone else carry his bag. It’s also difficult sleeping because of the high altitude and cold. But the truly mind-blowing landscapes and great camaraderie have kept us going.

During our climb up here we have seen with our own eyes the effects of global warming. The glaciers are surprisingly small and a fraction of what they used to be ten years ago. New river beds have been created in the last few years due to the sheer amount of glacial melt. Our guide Theophil believes the glaciers will disappear within 5 years. It will be a sad day when it happens.

We summit in two days time so we will have a better look at the glaciers then. We hope we can keep you updated along the way.

Kung Hei Fat Choy from the Project C:CHANGE team!